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Posted by on Nov 12, 2012 in Just Intonation, The Notes | 0 comments

Octave Reduction

Doubling the frequency of a note certainly changes it. The ear hears a higher-pitched note. But there is something in the essence of the note that does not change, a character that stays consistent through the octaves.

This allows a process called octave reduction. When you’re working with notes as ratios, it’s convenient to multiply or divide the raw ratio by 2, as many times as is necessary to bring it into the same octave as the tonic.

3/1 generates a perfect fifth. 3-1

This note is actually an octave plus a fifth above the tonic. Now divide by 2 and you have 3/2, one and a half times the original frequency, and just a fifth above. 3-2

The reference frequency is 1, the octave is 2, so what you want to achieve with octave reduction is a ratio, or fraction, between 1 and 2.

These are the beginnings of a scale, a collection of notes within a single octave. Such a scale can be repeated up and down the octaves to cover the whole range of hearing.

Next: The Major Third

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Posted by on Nov 11, 2012 in Just Intonation, The Lattice, The Notes | 0 comments

Notes As Ratios

Notes are pitched sounds. A given note means little by itself. It could be the tonic of a key, or some member of a scale based on a different tonic. By itself, it generates no tension, resolution or sense of place on the harmonic map.

So when I name a note in this blog, I’ll usually be referring to a ratio, the relationship between the note and a reference note — the tonic, or the root of a chord, or another note in the harmony or melody.

Ratios are fractions. The first number is divided by the second number to give the value of the ratio.

If the tonic is, say, 100 Hz, then another 100 Hz note is related to the tonic by the ratio 1/1. This is the interval of a unison, two identical notes.

Each note name on the lattice represents a unique ratio, relative to the tonic. The 1, at the center, stands for 1/1.

Next: Octave Reduction

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Posted by on Nov 6, 2012 in Just Intonation, The Notes | 0 comments

Notes and Intervals

A note, in music, is a sound with a particular pitch. Pitch is frequency, measured in cycles per second, or Hertz (Hz). The faster the vibration, the higher the pitch.

A vibration, at, say, 220 Hz, all by itself is a note by that general definition. But the note doesn’t acquire its distinct personality until it’s considered in relation to some other note. That relationship is called an interval.

Here is that 220 Hz note, played on a cello, all by itself: 220 Hz

Here it is in relation to a note an octave below, vibrating half as fast, at 110 Hz: 220 and 110

It still sounds like the same note. But now play it with a note vibrating at 1/3 of its frequency, or 73.33 Hz. The 220 Hz note acquires a very different character: 220 and 73

And now with a note at 1/5 its frequency, 44 Hz: 220 and 44

Even though the 220 Hz note always has the same pitch, in a different context it has a different personality and function.

The lattice of the Flying Dream video does not show absolute pitch. Each intersection, or node, represents a note, named according to its relationship to one special note: the Tonic.

Next: The Tonic

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