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Another Comma

Posted by on Mar 3, 2013 in Just Intonation, The Lattice | 0 comments

One more comma shows up in the central portion of the lattice.

In equal temperament, three major thirds adds up to an octave. The major third is an interval of four piano keys (out of 12) or 400 cents. Three of them is 1200 cents, exactly an octave.

In just intonation, this is not the case. The 5/4 major third is a narrower interval, 386.3 cents. Adding three of them together gives 1159 cents, 41 cents shy of an octave.

On the lattice, a stack of major thirds looks like this:

stack of thirdsEvery three places, the notes repeat — almost.

One such pair is the b6 and #5. In the key of C, they would be an Ab and a G#, and on the piano you would play them both with the black key between G and A.

diesis

In just intonation, the b6 is the ratio 8/5, which works out to 814 cents, and the #5 ratio is 25/16, which is 773 cents, almost a quarter tone flatter. (I describe cents and how to calculate them here.) The 41-cent distance between these two notes has several names. Mathieu’s is my favorite: Great Diesis (Dye-uh-sis).

Its formula is x5, x5, x5.

The reason I’m introducing these commas is to show how the lattice repeats itself. Here are the two commas on one lattice:

commas

The lattice extends infinitely in the horizontal direction, and every time it repeats, the pitch shifts by 22 cents. It also repeats in the vertical direction, shifting by 41 cents with every repetition.

Next: The Infinite Lattice

Commas

Posted by on Feb 28, 2013 in Just Intonation, The Lattice, The Notes | 0 comments

One of the beautiful qualities of the lattice is that the patterns repeat everywhere. Notes that are in the same relationship to each other on the lattice will always have the same difference in pitch, no matter how where you go. For example, a move of one space to the right will always be a move up a perfect fifth, or 702 cents, wherever it happens.

2-The pitch difference between the 2 and 2-, shown in the last post, is about 22 cents (actually 21.5). This is not a big enough difference to be a different scale degree. In the key of C, the 2 is a D. The 2- is also a D, but of a slightly different flavor.

No matter where you are on the lattice, dividing by 5, then multiplying by 3 four times (the distance between the 2- and 2) will result in a pitch difference of 22 cents. The ratio, octave reduced, is 81/80. This sort of small interval is called a comma.

Commas in general are little intervals that pop up again and again in just intonation. There are three or four of them that are important enough to have names. This one is called the syntonic comma, or comma of Didymus, or just plain “comma.” It has its own (very good, I think) Wikipedia article.

There are three such pairs in my home territory of the lattice, the part I currently feel comfortable roaming:

didymic pairsEach of the notes in the lower right portion is 22 cents sharp of its namesake in the upper left.

Mathieu calls these pairs of notes Didymic pairs, or comma siblings.

In my naming system, I use a minus sign to show that the note is a Didymic comma flat of its sibling, and a plus sign to show that it’s a Didymic comma sharp.

These siblings start to show how the lattice repeats (almost) as it expands. The almost-duplication goes out forever in all directions.

Next: Another Comma

Another Major Second: The 10/9

Posted by on Feb 26, 2013 in Just Intonation, The Lattice, The Notes | 0 comments

When I started exploring the extended lattice beyond the central 12 notes, the first note that was really new to me was the 10/9 major second, also called the minor or lesser whole tone. Now I call it the 2-.
Other-major-2-latticeThe lattice extends forever in all directions. When you continue multiplying and dividing, generating new notes beyond the boundaries of the central zone, the notes start to repeat, but not quite. The notes in red, the 2 and the 2-, are very close in pitch. They are different flavors, if you will, of the interval of a major second, or whole tone — a distance of two half steps, two keys on the piano.

Even though they are so close in pitch (204 cents for the 2, 182 cents for the 2-, only 22 cents apart), the two major seconds are generated in different ways and have very different functions and characters.

The 2 is an entirely overtonal note, that is, generated by multiplying alone. Such notes can be found in the chord of nature, the harmonics of a vibrating string. The character of notes is somewhat subjective, but for me, overtonal notes have a stable, sort of upbeat or positive character, and even though the 2 is somewhat dissonant, it has a kind of peaceful sound, that shows up well in ninth chords. Its recipe is x3, x3, or x9, octave reduced to 9/8.

The 2- is a combination of reciprocal and overtonal energy. It’s farther from the center than the 2, and more dissonant. Its recipe is /3, /3, x5, or 5/9, which octave reduces (or expands, really) to 10/9. It is darker, bluesier perhaps, and functions differently in chord progressions.

These very similar ratios, 10/9 and 9/8, 182 and 204 cents, are in fact entirely different beasts. Equal temperament has obscured this difference over the years. In ET, both notes are played at the compromise pitch of 200 cents, but that does not change the functional difference. It is extremely useful when writing or arranging to know whether you are playing a 2 or a 2-.

I tried making a demo of how they sound, as with other notes, but I think that played by themselves, out of context, the 2 and 2- are hard to tell apart. To get the difference, I think you have to sing them against a drone (scroll down the linked page a bit and there’s a list of Indian drones to play around with, it’s really fun to improvise melodies over these) and feel them in your own body. Mathieu shows you how to sing the 10/9 note in Harmonic Experience.

The functional differences really show up when you’re designing chord progressions that make sense. A chord progression is a journey on the lattice, and if you’re roaming in western territory, that is, to the left of the center, you want to use the 2- in your chords and melodies, and if you’re in overtonal, eastern lands, to the right of center, the 2 is going to sound better. It’s a crucial distinction in just intonation. Not so much in ET, since the notes are tuned the same — but awareness of where you are on the lattice really helps when you’re writing ET chord progressions.

It’s an old puzzle. Why do some progressions feel “right,” and others “wrong”? Knowing the map of harmony, the lattice, helps a lot. Much more to come in later posts.

Next: Commas

Extending the lattice

Posted by on Feb 17, 2013 in The Lattice, The Notes | 0 comments

As I’ve analyzed my songs on the lattice, and written new music using it as a tool, I have found that I have a certain palette of notes in my mind, a territory of the lattice that I can hear and think with. The notes in this portion are distinct individuals for me. Each one has its own personality, a distinct mix of attraction, repulsion, beauty and function. I’ve described and given examples of many of them.

When I wrote Flying Dream in 1981, I was consciously trying to write a song that used all twelve notes of the chromatic scale. The first part of making the Flying Dream animation was to reverse-engineer my own song, figuring out with my new tool (the lattice) what I had been instinctively hearing at the time.

220px-Crayola-64It turned out that I had been hearing about 18 notes in the song, including blue notes, and notes up in the northern part of the lattice. That made sense. I remember, as a kid, being disappointed to find out that there were only 12 total notes in music to work with. It seemed to limit the possibilities, like being stuck with the 8-color Crayola box.

The music I love to listen to, and make, has the big 64-color box with built-in sharpener. What’s up with Mick Jagger’s “Oooooh,” at the beginning of Gimme Shelter, or that guitar lick in Dizzy Miss Lizzy? These notes can’t be found on the piano, unless you have a pitch bend wheel. Check out this clip of Ray Charles bending notes in 2000 — now there’s a use of technology! The mystery of those notes, and others like them, has stuck with me, and now I feel like I’m getting to know them as friends.

Next: Another Major Second: The 10/9

Saturn’s Rings

Posted by on Feb 15, 2013 in Resonance | 0 comments

Why are the rings of Saturn so beautiful?

400px-Saturn_eclipse_exaggerated

The photo to the right was taken by the Cassini spacecraft when the sun was behind the planet, and backlighting the rings and the edge of the atmosphere. A type of solar eclipse never before seen by humans!

The rings are composed of millions of small particles, mostly ice, orbiting Saturn. They are neither arranged in a uniform disc, nor are they evenly spaced like the grooves on a record. Instead, they have an exquisite natural pattern, not quite like anything I know of on Earth. Click the image below for a full size, zoomable version. The bright bands are higher density, dark ones lower density.

2200px-Saturn's_rings_dark_side_mosaic

As with so many patterns in nature, this one is generated by simple rules. The main generator of the ring patterns is orbital resonance. The chunks that form the rings come in all sizes, from dust grains to small moons. When the orbital periods of two bodies are related to each other by a ratio of small whole numbers (sound familiar?), they will have a lot more gravitational influence on each other, just like the playground swing example from the last post. They give each other a little kick every time they come around, and either the relationship is unstable (one or both get booted out of their orbit) or stable (they settle in to a pattern and their resonance locks them into, um, harmony).

There are other examples in the Solar System. Pluto and Neptune are in a 3:2 resonance. Pluto orbits the sun twice for every three times Neptune goes around, and the relationship has persisted for a long time. They are playing a very slow perfect fifth. Orbital resonance draws them into this pattern. The legs are kicking at just the right time.

I think there is a very real connection between the beauty of the rings and the beauty of harmony. Stand close to someone, and sing a note while the other person sings a perfect fifth above. I think you will feel the resonance in your vocal cords, as it draws you into entrainment. Resonance influences and creates physical structures on every scale from subatomic particles to spiral galaxies.

Once again, I propose that when we experience the joy of musical harmony, we are seeing (and hearing and feeling) a little more deeply into the nature of the universe. The window is resonance. Here’s an interesting site with lots more about the connections between physics, sound and resonance.

And, to ride my hobby horse for just a second, I believe the dominance of equal temperament has obscured this deep insight and feeling. For many notes, the legs just don’t kick at quite the right time. No worries, I do think equal temperament is extremely useful, and it’s been used to make a whole lot of gorgeous music. I use it myself. But it has distanced us somewhat from the shot of pure joy that the resonances of music, in tune, can deliver. I’m hooked on the straight stuff, and the reason I’m writing this blog is the desire to share that joy.

Actually, I do know of an Earthly structure that resembles Saturn’s rings. It’s the scale, in just intonation.

colored chromatic

 

Next: Extending the lattice

 

Resonance

Posted by on Feb 14, 2013 in Resonance | 0 comments

Resonance, in general, is the tendency of a system to vibrate more strongly at some frequencies than at others.

280px-Little_girl_on_swing

A great example of this is a playground swing. Like any pendulum, the swing “wants” to swing at a particular frequency, its resonant frequency. You can make yourself go higher and higher without a lot of effort — if you swing your legs at just the right time. Move your legs a little too fast, or two slow, and you won’t go any higher. You can stop yourself cold, just by swinging your legs at a “wrong” frequency.

A similar thing happens when you sing in the shower. If you run up and down the scale, you will find that some frequencies are reinforced, and some canceled. It is much easier to make a louder sound if you are singing at the shower’s resonant frequency. Try it next time — pick your favorite shower song (One of mine is Englishman in New York — be yourself, no matter what they say) and sing up and down until you find a note that easily gets really loud. Then sing the song in that key.

Resonance, in music, makes entrainment easier, which facilitates musical joy.

Next: Saturn’s Rings

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