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Posted by on Dec 3, 2012 in The Notes | 2 comments

The Minor Third

Here’s an interesting and perhaps misunderstood note.

It’s a compound move on the lattice: down a third and up a fifth. Or up a fifth and down a third, it doesn’t matter what order. So the ratio is 3/5, or 6/5, octave reduced. The note is the minor third. I call it b3.

It lives a little bit flat of the major third — much less than an equal-tempered half step.

The closeness of major and minor, the small size of this particular half step, is one of the revelations I’ve had in the past couple of years. Major and minor are only about 2/3 of a semitone apart.

The difference between major and minor third is not so much one of pitch, but of polarity. The minor third contains reciprocal third energy and the major is overtonal third energy. A smile is just a frown turned upside down … Here’s an example that shows the reversal in polarity between major and minor third. This is untempered tuning. The pitch is moving by less than a piano key while dramatically shifting the harmonic ground.

I hear that same sort of “breathing” as in yesterday’s post — in, out, in, out.

I say “misunderstood,” because equal temperament changes the character of this note. Mathieu has a nice passage in Harmonic Experience:

When I first found my own voice inside a minor triad, I couldn’t believe it was so — well, so (arggh! I can scarcely say the dreaded word, but here goes) — so … happy. There. We are told from the beginning that minor is sad, the designated mode for angst and funerals. Well, to be honest, the equal-tempered version of the minor third is rather sad. [It] is too narrow, or flat. So piano minor is flat and sounds dull — the fire is out of it. But minor thirds in just intonation, and the minor triads they support, are swift and burning. They have the gypsy left in them, and do some leaping kind of dance.

– W.A. Mathieu, Harmonic Experience, p. 55

The gypsy really comes out to dance when it’s actual music, but to get an idea, here’s that same seesaw between minor and major. This time it’s tuned to equal temperament.

Is it my imagination, or do I hear a little melodrama here? Is the minor overly sad, the major a little over-the-top happy?

You may hear something entirely different. It is very interesting to go back and forth between these last two videos.

2 Comments

  1. Why do Minor Keys Sound Sad?
    If you want to answer the question, why minor chords sound sad, there is the problem, that some minor chords don’t sound sad. The solution is the Theory of Musical Equilibration. It says, that music is not able to transmit emotions directly. Music can just convey processes of will, but the music listener fills this processes of will with emotions. Similar, when you watch a dramatic movie in television, the movie cannot transmit emotions directly, but processes of will. The spectator perceives the processes of will dyed with emotions – identifying with the protagonist. When you listen music you identify too, but with an anonymous will now.
    If you perceive a major chord, you normally identify with the will “Yes, I want to…”. If you perceive a minor chord, you identify normally with the will “I don’t want any more…”. If you play the minor chord softly, you connect the will “I don’t want any more…” with a feeling of sadness. If you play the minor chord loudly, you connect the same will with a feeling of rage. You distinguish in the same way as you would distinguish, if someone would say the words “I don’t want anymore…” the first time softly and the second time loudly.
    This operations of will in the music were unknown until the Theory of Musical Equilibration discovered them. And therefore many previous researches in psychology of music failed. If you want more information about music and emotions and get the answer, why music touches us emotionally, you can download the essay “Music and Emotions – Research on the Theory of Musical Equilibration” for free. You can get it on the link:
    http://www.willimekmusic.de/music-and-emotions.pdf
    or on the online journal EUNOMIOS:
    http://www.eunomios.org
    Enjoy reading
    Bernd Willimek

  2. Excellent comment, Bernd. Thank you.

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